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My choice

(Short and sweet):
I didn’t know what I wanted to study. I was told that I should focus on what things I would like to be part of my future, more so than to know exactly what that future would be.
I like to experience different cultures and so I knew I wanted to study and work in English. This led me to apply for BSc in IB. It wasn’t until right before the application deadline that I finally chose DM to be my first priority thanks to the same tip that led me to apply for IB with a little help from a Johnny Depp quote.
Looking back, I’m very pleased with the decision I made! If you’re interested, you can read the whole story and the quote down below. 😉

(Full version):
I was always pretty sure I wanted to study at university but never really knew what I wanted to do. The fact that I had all my internships in veterinary clinics despite ending up at CBS is a testament to that indecisiveness. It goes without saying that I needed a gap year.

After having travelled for some months I realized that it wasn’t important to know the name of the company or position I wanted to fill in 5 years, instead it’s important to find out what things would make that job enjoyable. I like travelling and found out how important the international environment was for me, which factored into me choosing an English-speaking program.

This led to the BSc in International Business being my first priority with BSc in Digital Management being my 2nd or 3rd. International Business had an edge though as growing up there was always a hype or fascination surrounding the program with Denmark’s highest GPA. Heck even my mom studied on that program, and on the pioneer class at that. So although I have a certain fascination with technology, which sparked my interest in Digital Management, International Business had been on the back of my mind for years.

As the deadline closed in however, I started to think that prestige probably wasn’t the best motivation to apply somewhere, nor should I start studying just for the sake of studying. It wasn’t until two hours before the application deadline for the first quota that I changed my decision however – diamonds are made under pressure right?
As I was finally feeling the gravity of the decision looming, thinking through very carefully whether I had in fact made the right choice for the last time, I randomly remembered a Johnny Depp quote (Yes I’m serious and no, I don’t base all my life-decisions on actors’ quotes) that goes like this:

“If you love two people at the same time, choose the second one. Because if you truly loved the first one, you wouldn’t fall in love again”.

Although the quote is clearly about something different than choosing study programmes, it felt relevant to the decision I was faced with, which made me change DM to my first priority. A decision that I up until this point am so happy that I made and one that’s made me appreciate Depp as an actor more.

My programme

My first big surprise starting in Digital Management was definitely that we had to learn programming. They were not good at clarifying that on the website or brochures, ask any of my classmates and they’ll probably agree. The program was brand new though, we knew THAT much getting into it, so no hard feelings.
The only thing I really expected was to think about and discuss emerging technologies and their relevance for businesses now and in the future, which we do, and it’s one of the best things about DM, but I didn’t expect for us to work with and learn how to apply it.

My second (And bigger) surprise was that programming was not as hard to learn as I thought it would be. I’m very happy that I did end up in a program that taught it. Strangely, I’m also happy I was (intentionally or unintentionally) not informed that we were going to learn how to program. There is some kind of IT-fear out there which scares away people who don’t think they have what it takes to learn technical skills, that they aren’t “nerdy” enough. This fear is also the culprit behind IT- and other technical educations traditionally being so oversaturated with males. But, thanks to virtually no one in my class knowing that we were going to struggle with machine learning and error codes, Digital Management did not meet that fate. The program didn’t become oversaturated with “geeks” or “nerds” or any type at all. Instead we ended up with many different types, all somewhat interested in technology, which led to a very interesting class dynamic academically but especially socially. What’s more we ended up basically being half boys half girls with most students, regardless of gender or type agreeing that programming wasn’t all that bad.

My advice

1
Decide what the more general things that interest or matters to you are, don’t get caught up in the “what job can I have in 5 years” mentality:
I knew that I like experiencing different cultures and am easily fascinated by gadgets. So naturally an international program specializing in the business value of tech was probably the way to go.

2
Go with your gut feeling: If you feel right about something, go for it. If you feel like something is off, think over thoroughly if it’s a reason to change your decisions/priorities, find out how you really feel about it, and go with that feeling.